Brett.Ullman

Category - mental health

Walking Wounded: New Public Version

Over the past 4 years, I have had businesses, conference, staff training days & schools ask me if I have a version of my Walking Wounded talk for Public settings (no faith-based content).  I am happy to announce that I have created a version of the talk that is great for all of these environments.

If you think this talk might be good in your workplace, conference or school please send me an email.

Thanks

 

CCLP 014: Brett Ullman On Anxiety, Depression And Mental Health In Church Leaders And In The Church

I had the privilege of sharing my mental health journey with Carey Nieuwhof on his Canadian Church Leaders Podcast. It’s probably the longest conversation I have had on my journey to date.

Mental health is not a subject we discuss well in the church. But at any given time, about 20% of your church and leaders are struggling with various mental health issues.

Brett Ullman, a nationally respected speaker and authority on parenting and teens, talks about how his struggles started and how to respond in the church and in leadership when mental health struggles arise.

Please click here to listen to the podcast. I would also encourage you to subscribe to this podcast. It’s one that I never miss.

What adolescents (or teenagers) need to thrive | Charisse Nixon | TEDxPSUErie

So good. #parentingresearch

We are plugging into electronics, but not people.

Charisse Nixon is a development psychologist who studies at risk behavior as well as protective factors among children and adolescents. According to Nixon, we know that kids and adults are suffering. In fact, some research studies have shown that rates of depression and anxiety have actually increased over the past 50 years. According to recent research, we know that approximately 1 in 5 youth will suffer from a major depressive episode by the time they leave high school. In the middle of our fast paced, technologically driven world, adolescents stand before you — searching for purpose… searching to fit in and belong. After decades of research of those who have studied this field, one thing is very clear: meaningful connections serve as protective factors in the lives of our youth. Nixon shares her ideas on how we can help our youth build those meaningful connections.

Click here or the video below to watch the video.

Why Are More American Teenagers Than Ever Suffering From Severe Anxiety?

So much information in this article. I would challenge everyone to take a few minutes and walk through it.

Over the last decade, anxiety has overtaken depression as the most common reason college students seek counseling services. In its annual survey of students, the American College Health Association found a significant increase — to 62 percent in 2016 from 50 percent in 2011 — of undergraduates reporting “overwhelming anxiety” in the previous year.

Those numbers — combined with a doubling of hospital admissions for suicidal teenagers over the last 10 years, with the highest rates occurring soon after they return to school each fall — come as little surprise to high school administrators across the country, who increasingly report a glut of anxious, overwhelmed students.

Teenagers raised in more affluent communities might seemingly have less to feel anxious about. But Suniya Luthar, a professor of psychology at Arizona State University who has studied distress and resilience in both well-off and disadvantaged teenagers, has found that privileged youths are among the most emotionally distressed young people in America. “These kids are incredibly anxious and perfectionistic,” she says, but there’s “contempt and scorn for the idea that kids who have it all might be hurting.”

For many of these young people, the biggest single stressor is that they “never get to the point where they can say, ‘I’ve done enough, and now I can stop,’ ” Luthar says. “There’s always one more activity, one more A.P. class, one more thing to do in order to get into a top college. Kids have a sense that they’re not measuring up. The pressure is relentless and getting worse.”

Anxious kids certainly existed before Instagram, but many of the parents I spoke to worried that their kids’ digital habits — round-the-clock responding to texts, posting to social media, obsessively following the filtered exploits of peers — were partly to blame for their children’s struggles. To my surprise, anxious teenagers tended to agree.

Click here for the entire article.