Brett.Ullman

Tag - pornography

The Porn Project – A Christian Response to Pornography

The Porn Project in 1 sentence: Stop Looking at Porn

But how do you actually do that?

This talk will challenge our beliefs (what is porn?, history, theology), our behaviours (addiction, accountability, triggers, lifestyle, environment etc), and look beyond ourselves at how porn might be hurting others around us (spouse, children, dating relationships, people involved in the pornography industry etc).

The goal is to be less of a presentation and more of a training. Training to equip and empower individuals (men and women), parents and leaders on how to navigate this conversation no matter if you dabble, struggle, or are addicted to pornography in any of its forms.

Moving towards practical solutions from just talk
Moving towards wholeness from the brokenness.
Moving towards freedom from pornography

This is my full presentation on pornography. If you want to show this to your church, youth group, camp etc you can buy a digital download from this Vimeo link – https://vimeo.com/ondemand/thepornproject

If this talk helped you or someone in your family and you would like to make a small donation to the Charity (Worlds Apart) you can do so from this link – https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/15850 Thanks for any support.

Please check out my website https://www.brettullman.com for more information.

If you are watching “Game of Thrones,” you are watching porn.

Interesting article. Easy to read and to the point. Love to hear your thoughts.

If someone cropped out one of the graphic sex scenes from Game of Thrones and put that single scene online, by itself apart from any of the plot and intrigue, and your teenage son downloaded it, would you call it porn? Yes, you would.
So why is it that when we dress these scenes up with HBO glitz and glamour that all of a sudden they are socially acceptable? Is it because we actually love porn, but don’t want to admit that publicly? We don’t want to surf the dirty websites, but if we can get our porn via HBO (all on Netflix and/or Amazon Prime now, by the way), it’s like having our cake and eating it too. Porn without the social stigma. Porn that your spouse actually lets you watch. Porn you can rationalize.

And if you think you can somehow filter out the porn and only take in the art, you are deceived and double-minded as well. Porn does what porn does: as soon as it enters the scene, it removes all dignity and humanity. All that is left is body parts and the consuming of other humans. You can’t keep someone’s dignity once you have already devoured it. 
You don’t get porn and human dignity; you get porn or human dignity.
Choose wisely.

How to talk to your children about pornography – book suggestions

We are living in a world where the question is not if your kids will see pornography, but when. We need to help equip our kids to deal with porn. This video shows 2 great books for parents of young children that you can read with your kids to help explain this tough topic.

Canada
Good Pictures Bad Pictures Jr – https://amzn.to/2ItqkNb
Good Pictures Bad Pictures – https://amzn.to/2MZ7XmM

US
Good Pictures Bad Pictures Jr – https://amzn.to/2lA7dIg
Good Pictures Bad Pictures – https://amzn.to/2MraCom

Love to hear your thoughts.

What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn – NY Times

This is not an easy article to read but it is a very important one for us as parents and leaders so we can see where culture it as today and how we help our kids to have a better understanding of pornography. I don’t think most parents faith-based or not would want their kids to view pornography, but we all need to talk to our kids about pornography and teach them how to process what they might see:

American adolescents watch much more pornography than their parents know — and it’s shaping their ideas about pleasure, power and intimacy. Can they be taught to see it more critically?

Statistics are also scary:

On average, boys are around 13, and girls are around 14, when they first see pornography, says Bryant Paul, an associate professor at Indiana University’s Media School and the author of studies on porn content and adolescent and adult viewing habits. In a 2008 University of New Hampshire survey, 93 percent of male college students and 62 percent of female students said they saw online porn before they were 18. Many females, in particular, weren’t seeking it out. Thirty-five percent of males said they had watched it 10 or more times during adolescence.

For all the parents who tell me that they want to be the ones to talk to their kids about sex and porn we seem to be failing in this regard:

It’s not surprising, then, that some adolescents use porn as a how-to guide. In a study that Rothman carried out in 2016 of 72 high schoolers ages 16 and 17, teenagers reported that porn was their primary source for information about sex — more than friends, siblings, schools or parents.

Drew, who had once used porn as his main sex educator, was now thinking about sex differently. “Some things need to come to us naturally, not by watching it and seeing what turns you on,” he told me. The discussions about anatomy and fake displays of pleasure made him realize that girls didn’t always respond as they did in porn and that they didn’t all want the same things. And guys didn’t, either. Maybe that porn clip in which the nice, tender guy didn’t excite the girl was wrong.

In our church world, we need to look at how we can have better conversations on pornography. With many of today’s teenagers getting their sex education from pornography we have to look at how we can help parents have this conversation in their homes, and then assist them by equipping and empowering them in our churches.

This actually would fall under a larger topic of equipping parents to help their kids get a Biblical Worldview of healthy sexuality. This would encompass everything from pornography, sexuality, dating, media awareness, pregnancy, STI’s, etc.

Love to hear peoples thoughts.

Click here for the entire article.