Brett.Ullman

Tag - parenting

Gillette’s New Ad On Toxic Masculinity Is Breathtaking — And Necessary

I had a chance to watch the new Gillette Ad on Toxic masculinity. It is really good. I liked this article on the video from the Scary Mommy blog.

I also think that as we deconstruct toxic masculinity we need more teaching, and discussion on what regular masculinity looks like. Anything that starts this discussion is great to see.

The #MeToo movement has opened a lot of conversations about the way men treat women. We know it’s up to men to change their behavior, but women have been saying that for generations. We need men to hold other men accountable. Enter Gillette’s powerful new ad that asks them to do exactly that.

The ad, targeted at men and called “We Believe,” begins with audio of news about the #MeToo movement. A narrator then takes on the common phrase, “boys will be boys,” asking, “It this the best a man can get? Is it? We can’t hide from it. It has gone on far too long. We can’t laugh it off, making the same old excuses.”
The commercial depicts men stepping in to stop their brethren from catcalling and telling women to smile. It shows a father breaking up a fight between two little boys at a BBQ instead of letting them “be boys” and another dad fending off bullies from a little boy while his small son watches intently. It shows a mother cradling her bullied son as vile text messages from his tormentors are shown.


Click here for the article. The link to the video is on this article as well as copied below.

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is ‘Impossible To Let Go’

Vaping seems to be a huge conversation with teens and parents as I travel. Here is another article talking about the addictive nature of vaping. I always hear people say that vaping is better than inhaling cigarette smoke. Why do we have to inhale anything is usually my response. If you are using a vape to switch from cigarettes I think it is great. Then you should be decreasing and coming off of vape as well.

E-cigarettes are tiny — they look like a pen or flash drive. When someone vapes, there’s no fire, ash or smoky odor. Instead, the devices heat up and vaporize a liquid or solid. And vaping appears to have taken off among young people.

“They specifically use nicotine salts,” Liptzin says. “We have no research that I could find on nicotine salts that are inhaled, because it’s so new.”

Most educators, parents and students “don’t realize how much nicotine is in there, or that there’s even any nicotine,” she says. “That’s what the research tells us.”

“So my biggest concern,” he says, “is, you know, right now I’m puffing, puffing, happy, worry-free, and then in 20 years I’ll have to explain to my kids why I’ve developed popcorn lung — or some new form of lung cancer,” Lavandier says. “Because I didn’t know what the risks were of e-cigarettes. It terrifies me.”

love to hear peoples thoughts. Thanks

click here for the entire article

How To Talk With Your Kids About Vaping

I often find myself talking to teenagers (and even their parents) who are telling me that there are no dangers to vaping. I saw this today and thought I would post it to get some conversation going on this topic.

• Exposure to nicotine is worrisome in teens and young adults because nicotine can be highly addictive. Due to the fact that the brain is undergoing massive changes during the teen years, nicotine use may rewire the brain, making it easier to get hooked on other substances and contribute to problems with concentration, learning and impulse control.
• Most vape devices release a number of potentially toxic substances, although exposure is considerably lower than those found in regular cigarettes.
• Dependence develops when the body adapts to repeated exposure to vaping. When a person stops vaping, he or she can experience withdrawal symptoms, although likely not as intense as with conventional cigarettes.
• Vaping may be increasing risks of smoking. Teens and young adults who vape are almost four times as likely as their non-vaping peers to begin smoking cigarettes.
• Injuries and poisonings have resulted from devices exploding and direct exposure to e-liquids.
• Long-term studies are needed to evaluate the risks of cancer and respiratory illness, though there is some concern that vaping can cause coughing and wheezing and may exacerbate asthma.

Love to hear any thoughts you have.

Click here for the entire article.

Daddy I Do (2010) – Full Documentary

Really interesting documentary on the issues of “purity culture” within the Christian Church. I have seen too much damage when we make virginity an idol as opposed to an ideal. The video is from 2010 but it still worth the watch. Students today have so many questions and we are offering so little education on how to have a Biblical Worldview of healthy sexuality. We need to do a better job as parents, educators, and the church in this conversation.

**language in the video.

Synopsis: The Purity Ball symbolizes a father’s protection over his daughter’s virginity, but how does this reflect in the choices she makes, understanding her sexuality, and knowing her worth as a woman? This documentary examines the effects of Abstinence-Only Programs versus Comprehensive Sex Education in schools and what society can do to help lower teen pregnancies, abortions, and STD’S, as well as poverty and sexual abuse.

“Daddy I Do” shows how teen pregnancy, abortion, poverty, and sexual abuse all trace back to Sex Education in America. Opinions about sex stem from religious views, but it’s up to you, the viewer, to determine whether or not ideologies should decide what’s best for our children and our country. I strongly believe this film has the power to shed light on topics that many Americans are too afraid to address. Knowledge is power, and we need to use that power towards good. I encourage you to see the deeper meaning behind “Daddy I Do”, in hopes of a better tomorrow through positive action.

Love to hear your thoughts

Is our Fear-Based Parenting Negatively affecting our kids?

Is the way we seem to be over-parenting our kids affecting how they are turning out?

Could our own fears start to affect our kids as they grow up? 

Is there any fears that YOU have that might have migrated over to your kids lives? Driving, going out, dating …?

Today we look at a blog from Tim Elmore and a few stories from my speaking dates on fear-based parents.

The Most Underused Medication for Mental Health

Today I want to talk about the most underused medication for mental health struggles: Exercise.

Now, please listen clearly I am not saying to stop seeing your doctors, psychologists psychiatrist, and other specialists who are helping you on this journey. In the blog Everyday Health they say:

“Exercise won’t cure anxiety or depression, but the physical and psychological benefits can improve the symptoms,” explains Sally R. Connolly, LCSW, a therapist at the Couples Clinic of Louisville in Kentucky. “Research shows that at least 30 minutes of exercise three to five days a week can significantly make a difference.” Some studies have suggested that regular exercise can help alleviate anxiety as much as anxiety medications, and the anxiety-relieving effects of exercise may last longer than those of drugs.”

Love to hear your thoughts on mental health and exercise.