Brett.Ullman

This Woman Takes Selfies With the Men Who Catcall Her

I shared this over facebook and there was a ton of response on private messages. Thought this should be shared as part of my blog.

Yet as most women will attest, street harassment is still an ever-present part of public existence. And while the women I know have had strangers yelling at them, leering, making kissing noises, and being all manner of creep for longer than they can remember, it can still be hard to know what to do when it happens. I’m a look-straight-ahead-and don’t-acknowledge-their-pathetic-existence kind of person, but a lot of my friends opt for yelling expletives back or offering a simple middle finger. It’s a tightrope of standing up for ourselves vs. offering too much attention to these cretins (factoring in the possibility of escalation or violence)–just another exhausting way women are made to bear responsibility for navigating men’s behavior.

This is not ok. How do we teach many men to be different than the way that they are?

Click here for the entire post.

What are your favourite books dealing with any aspect of Parenting?

As I do research for my new talk on parenting I am wondering what are the absolute must-reads you suggest to parents?

Let me give you my top to get it started:

  1. It’s Just a Phase (Amazon)
  2. The Collapse of Parenting (Amazon)
  3. Teen Years (Amazon)
  4. Revolutionary Parenting (Amazon)
  5. Queen Bees and WannaBees (Amazon)

What do you suggest? Thanks for any help

Brett

 

 

Brett Ullman: Presentations – the man talk

As I enter my 20th year speaking I thought I would take some time over the next week to go over each of the talks that I have. My talks are heavily researched and I am updating my talks all the time.

Talk title: the man talk

Why would you bring me into your church, school or conference to speak this talk? –This is a talk I have done for dozens of men’s breakfasts over the years. It is really challenging men to be better fathers, husbands, and boyfriends. It is a very practical talk.

Talk Description:

The Man Talk is what it sounds like – a discussion about what it’s like to be a Man today. It’s a real talk, a meat and potatoes approach to issues pressing us from all sides:

Being the best Father I can be.
What it’s like to be a Husband and a Servant.
Christian men and sex.
How to lead my family – spiritually.
Dating as a Christian – A how to.

Boyfriend. Father. Son. Husband. Leader. Lover. Fixer. Buddy. Servant. Sexual. Boss. Hero. Boys Adrift. Friend. Guide. Daddy. Courageous. Loyal.

Everybody needs a good talk at some point. And, this is one for you. Everyone’s welcome at the man talk – ladies, no jeering.

Real Men who aren’t afraid to talk about Man stuff, and who are better for it.

What environments can this talk be done in?

  • Conference
  • Camp retreat
  • Men’s breakfast

If you would like more information or would like to book me for a talk please email me at brett@brettullman.com.

How the smartphone affected an entire generation of kids

As I continue my research into loneliness I find more and more articles talking about social media. We need to make sure we don’t have a knee-jerk reaction and just say all social media is bad. This article has a very balanced perspective.

However, that changed a few years ago, when I started to notice big shifts in teens’ behavior and attitudes in the yearly surveys of 11 million young people that I analyze for my research. Around 2010, teens started to spend their time much differently from the generations that preceded them. Then, around 2012, sudden shifts in their psychological well-being began to appear. Together, these changes pointed to a generational cutoff around 1995, which meant that the kids of this new, post-millennial generation were already in college.

These teens and young adults all have one thing in common: Their childhood or adolescence coincided with the rise of the smartphone.

Of course, correlation doesn’t prove causation: Maybe unhappy people use screen devices more.

To be clear, moderate smartphone and social media use – up to an hour a day – is not linked to mental health issues. However, most teens (and adults) are on their phones much more than that.

Click here for the entire article.

Have you ever wondering how checking your phone every 5 minutes, every day for 4-5 years might affect you physiologically?

Love to hear your thought on this.