Brett.Ullman

Author - brett ullman

the Sex Talk: A Christian Worldview of Healthy Sexuality | Parenting Tips

This is my full presentation on how we can help our kids get a Christian Sexual Ethic or a Christian Worldview of Healthy Sexuality. This “Sex Talk” or as it used to be called “the birds and the bees” is something that we all must do as parents. Christian parenting in this area adds another layer as we come from a very different worldview than mainstream society. We do need to have better education around this topic of sex in our homes, than our churches, and then in our schools.

Description:
Everyone likes to feel comfortable. In fact, we pad our lives with comforts of all kinds and those things that make life uncomfortable for us we push as far from us as possible. If you’re like most people, you quietly withdrew as you read the title of this piece (the.sex.talk) in Christian context.

The Why: One scary statistic says that 70-80% of Christian Young Adults have had sex before they get married. We need to completely rethink how we engage students in this conversation as parents, youth leaders and as members of the greater Christian community. What a difficult time to grow up as a teenager; so many questions and so few people willing to answer them. As Christian adults, we cannot continue to be silent on these issues of sexuality.

The How: This talk helps equip and empower parents as to how to help their kids get a Biblical worldview of healthy sexuality. The.Sex.Talk is an unapologetic, straight-forward talk on the nature of sex in this era of modern, overly-sexualized culture. Addressing such issues as Christian faith, STI’s, pregnancy, pornography, sexting, singleness and grace, Brett Ullman tackles the often awkward and uncomfortable topic of sex in a direct, Biblical fashion linking current topics and trends with Biblical examples and principles.

The Goal: This project attempts to create and promote a culture where Christian parents and their teenagers are equipped and empowered to have this conversation resulting in better, healthier choices in the area of sex for their teenagers.

Our media-saturated culture consistently floods our minds with inaccurate, often twisted truths about the true nature of sex. As fellow journeyers, let’s ask the tough questions together as we look to connect our ancient faith with our modern world.

This is my full presentation called the sex talk. If you want to show this to your church, youth group, camp etc you can buy a digital download from the Vimeo link – https://vimeo.com/ondemand/thesextalk

If this talk helped you or someone in your family and you would like to make a small donation to the Charity (Worlds Apart) you can do so from this link – https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/15850

Thanks for any support.

Christian Parenting | Child Discipline | Is spanking ok?

I get this question a few times a month from Christian Parents: Can I spank my kids? It comes in different forms

1. Can I speak my kids? this sounds like you are asking are you allowed to spank your kids. The question seems to be asking IS it biblical or even is it allowed by law. Will I be charged for spanking a child if you do.

2. Should I spank my kids? Which seems to be more should I actually do this? Is this the right way to discipline my kids?

Parenting is hard. Christian parenting just might be harder as we come from a different worldview that much of society. We must grow our parenting skills to be able to learn how to discipline our kids properly. This video is talking about only one concept of child discipline ( ie spanking). We will have to look another time at how do we discipline a child and other good questions.

Gillette’s New Ad On Toxic Masculinity Is Breathtaking — And Necessary

I had a chance to watch the new Gillette Ad on Toxic masculinity. It is really good. I liked this article on the video from the Scary Mommy blog.

I also think that as we deconstruct toxic masculinity we need more teaching, and discussion on what regular masculinity looks like. Anything that starts this discussion is great to see.

The #MeToo movement has opened a lot of conversations about the way men treat women. We know it’s up to men to change their behavior, but women have been saying that for generations. We need men to hold other men accountable. Enter Gillette’s powerful new ad that asks them to do exactly that.

The ad, targeted at men and called “We Believe,” begins with audio of news about the #MeToo movement. A narrator then takes on the common phrase, “boys will be boys,” asking, “It this the best a man can get? Is it? We can’t hide from it. It has gone on far too long. We can’t laugh it off, making the same old excuses.”
The commercial depicts men stepping in to stop their brethren from catcalling and telling women to smile. It shows a father breaking up a fight between two little boys at a BBQ instead of letting them “be boys” and another dad fending off bullies from a little boy while his small son watches intently. It shows a mother cradling her bullied son as vile text messages from his tormentors are shown.


Click here for the article. The link to the video is on this article as well as copied below.

Rap Music and Substance Use: Addiction and Mental Health

Came across this really good article on drugs and mental health looking at it from the standpoint of rap music. It goes through the history of drugs and alcohol through the last few decades. Well worth the read.

In a 2013 interview with The Arsenio Hall Show, Kendrick Lamar said in reference to molly and its popularity in rap music, “You have certain artists portraying these trends and don’t really have that lifestyle and then it gives off the wrong thing.”

In 2017, Beeson and a team of researchers at Northwestern University conducted an analysis of the Billboard Hot 100 year-end charts from 2007 to 2016 to determine the frequency of alcohol-related terms in popular music.

His team found that about 33.7 percent of rap songs on the Billboard charts contained at least one reference to alcohol. The rappers with the most alcohol mentions in their Billboard Hot 100 music during that time period were Flo Rida, Drake and Lil Wayne.
Beeson said alcohol mentions are not necessarily an endorsement of drinking. While some rap artists examined in the analysis promoted alcohol use, others stressed the dangers of heavy drinking.
“The music does not cause teens to drink, but it can influence them to do so,” said Beeson. “There is research suggesting that a correlation exists between mentions of alcohol and drug use and teen substance use.


“I couldn’t believe that anybody could be naturally happy without being on something. So I would say to anybody: ‘It does get better.’”
EMINEM

“My anxiety and depression have ruled my life for as long as I can remember and I never leave the house because of it.”
KID CUDI

Click here for the entire article

YouTube influencers: Inside the weird world of social media burnout

Great video talking about social media. Something parents and students should watch. * small language

What’s it like to have millions of fans when you’re 10? What’s it like to have thousands of people insult or adore you? Welcome to the strange world of social media superstars.

Stephanie Hegarty meets the young people whose lives are built around likes, but are increasingly suffering from mental health problems and burn out.

If you’ve been affected by any of the issues in this video, you can find lots of advice and information at BBC Action Line.

Click here to watch the video.