Brett.Ullman

Parents and Screentime. . . A Surprising Infographic . . .

So often we as parents are talking to out kids about their time spent on screens while taking little time to examine our own screen time. Great blog from Walt Mueller.

Then, I took the next step. It’s a step that hushes the parental gasps. In case you’re wondering where our kids learn this stuff, we need to look no further than ourselves. Late last year, the folks at Common Sense Media  released the data on parents. . . and it’s 9 hours and 22 minutes.

Click here for the entire blog. This is another blog I would highly challenge parents and youth workers to sign up for. Amazing content sent to your inbox for free each week.

 

How will Canadian Marijuana Legalization Affect Teens

Really great article from Ron Powell. We need to have these conversations in our homes, churches and youth groups.

CANADIAN STATISTICS

  • 79% of people in Alberta over the age of 15 drink to some extent.
  • 83% of grade 12 Ontario students admit to using alcohol
  • 49% of Ontario grade 12 students admit to binge drinking
  • Among Ontario grade 11 drinkers, 13 years was the average age of first exposure, and 14 years was the average age for first intoxication experience.

Click here for the entire article.

Side Note: This is a great blog to follow for parents and youth workers.

 

50 Questions To Ask Your Kids Instead Of Asking “How Was Your Day”

Dinner is a great time for people to engage in conversations. Here are some great questions.

So I asked our writers to share some of their favorite conversation starters with their kids. These are especially great after a long school day when your babies don’t want to chat.

  1. What made you smile today?
  2. Can you tell me an example of kindness you saw/showed?
  3. Was there an example of unkindness? How did you respond?
  4. Does everyone have a friend at recess?
  5. What was the book about that your teacher read?
  6. What’s the word of the week?
  7. Did anyone do anything silly to make you laugh?
  8. Did anyone cry?
  9. What did you do that was creative?
  10. What is the most popular game at recess?

40 more questions on her website.  Click here for the entire article.

How To Actually Comfort Your Partner During An Anxiety Attack (Because Saying ‘Don’t Worry’ Does Nothing)

We often talk about how someone struggling with anxiety or panic can help themselves but we rarely seem to talk about how loved ones can support people in this tough moment. This is a really good practical article on how to help people going through a panic attack.

Anxiety is difficult on a few levels for the individual that suffers from the disorder, but when it’s your partner, it can be challenging to help them get back to being themselves after having a panic attack. It’s scary, it’s confusing, and to some sufferers it can feel incredibly isolating. Let me iterate here that it is never your responsibility to “fix” what is going on, as it’s something only the sufferer can do, but sometimes it can be useful to know how to help your partner feel better. Here are a few things you can do to help your partner when they are having a panic attack.

For the entire article please click here.

A photographer edits out our smartphones to show our strange and lonely new world

Do you see yourself in these photos? If so changes need to be made.

Are you reading this on a handheld device? There’s a good chance you are. Now imagine how’d you look if that device suddenly disappeared. Lonely? Slightly crazy? Perhaps next to a person being ignored? As we are sucked in ever more by the screens we carry around, even in the company of friends and family, the hunched pose of the phone-absorbed seems increasingly normal.

Click here for the entire article.

Being silenced on sex isn’t the end of Christianity

Really like this. So many things the Church can engage in.

Is the conservative arm of the church so focused on sexuality and marriage that being told to shut up about it is seen as tantamount to a complete public gag order?

In asking this I’m not defending the public vitriol heaped on bakers and brewers. But I don’t think being silenced on sex can be equated with the death of Christianity.

Feel free, outraged ministers and bloggers, to speak up about immigration policy, climate change, and gun control.

Feel free to enter the public square and champion the rights of disadvantaged first nations.

Please, don’t hold back on the corrosive effects of our nations’ addictions to gambling and alcohol and junk food.

Fulfill your mandate, please, to steward creation by opposing rampant strip mining, destructive pipelines, and corporate greed.

Feel free to speak out against bulging military spending, arms races and world leaders’ compulsion for conflict.

Sure, you’ll get plenty of debate, and there will be those who’ll tell you to keep quiet. These aren’t easy matters to address, nor popular campaigns to engage in. But surely, the church should have as much to say about justice, reconciliation, ecology and peacemaking as it does about marriage and sexuality.

Click here for the entire article.

The biggest threat facing middle-age men isn’t smoking or obesity. It’s loneliness.

I found this article really interesting. I would say that I agree. I know it is a struggle I have had in my own life.

This is a long article but one I would challenge men (and women) to read and to take some time to ponder where are you in this conversations and look at how you might be able to make some changes.

As men grow older, they tend to let their friendships lapse. But there’s still time to do something about it.

I TURNED 40 IN MAY. I have a wife and two young boys. I moved to the suburbs a few years ago, where I own a fairly ugly home with white vinyl siding and two aging station wagons with crushed Goldfish crackers serving as floor mats. When I step on a Lego in the middle of the night on my way to the bathroom, I try to tell myself that it’s cute that I’ve turned into a sitcom dad.

During the week, much of my waking life revolves around work. Or getting ready for work. Or driving to work. Or driving home from work. Or texting my wife to tell her I’m going to be late getting home from work.

When people with children become overscheduled, they don’t shortchange their children, they shortchange their friendships. “And the public health dangers of that are incredibly clear,”

Click here for the entire article.

We Can Change the World by Changing the Way We Raise Boys

Saw this online yesterday and loved it. Thought I would share it with you in case you have not seen it. Well worth the read.

Click here for the entire article.

Men do not have to give up their masculine nature. They have to redefine it. They don’t need to be warriors for territory and power over others. They can be warriors for peace, the environment, social justice and equal rights.

Men do not need to become more like women. They need to become more fully human, more in touch with who they are, free to achieve their human potential, including the full range of emotional expression.

Social change happens one person at a time. When we change the way we raise boys, we will change the world.

Serving Parents Who Do Not Go To Your Church

This is a really good article for anyone who works with students in the church world. I have often said that a Jr/Sr High Pastors job needs to be educating and empowering parents as well. As a parent myself I had to take a second and try and figure out if I am one of the parenting styles he mentions:

  • Helicopter Parents– they hover too close to the kids at all times.
  • Karaoke Parents– they try too hard to be cool, often parroting back what their kids do, say, and wear.
  • Dry-Cleaner Parents– drop their kids off for others to raise.
  • Volcano Parents– erupt over minor issues. (If you’ve never witnessed this just spend more time at Wal-Mart.  You’re bound to encounter these parents.)
  • Dropout Parents– these parents have just quit on their kids.
  • Bullied Parents– can’t stand up to their kids.
  • Groupie Parents– treat their kids like rock stars.
  • Commando Parents – let rules trump relationships.

There are some good practical ways to engage the parents of the students you work with.

Click here for the entire article.